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US Marshals Badge Plaque / Podium Plaque

Starting at: $112.95


  • Model: US MB Plaque

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An elegant table stand is perfect to avoid wall mounting




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U.S. MARSHALS SERVICE BADGE WOODEN SEAL PLAQUE

Made from solid mahogany this United States Federal Marshals Services Badge(USMS) wooden seal plaque and podium logo emblem is hand carved and finished by our expert craftsmen. The mahogany is cured and treated at our own factory to avoid warping and twisting over the years and a special keyhole slot is recessed into the rear to ensure a flush fitting on ay wall surface.

Call our customer support team at 1-877-543-6094 or use our Live Chat feature during business hours or order online! Our wooden seals are always:

100% solid mahogany: (no cheap hollow stuff or fake wood made out of plastic).
Kiln dried to prevent warping: which creates a product that will last a lifetime.
Pantone color matched: to ensure your color requirements are an exact match.
Hand made by trained professional cabinet makers and artisans.
Shipped on a timely basis: Option for Express Delivery (Approximately 14 days).

About this seal!

The United States Marshals Badge Plaque (USMS)) is a federal law enforcement agency within the United States Department of Justice and is the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the United States. The official spelling is the plural form "US Marshals Service", not the possessive form "US Marshals' Service."

The USMS is the enforcement arm of the federal courts, protecting federal courts and ensuring the effective operation of the judicial system.

The offices of U.S. Marshals and Deputy Marshals were created by the first Congress in the Judiciary Act of 1789, the same legislation that established the federal judicial system. In a letter to Edmund Randolph, the first Attorney General of the United States, President George Washington wrote,

Impressed with a conviction that the due administration of justice is the firmest pillar of good Government, I have considered the first arrangement of the Judicial department as essential to the happiness of our Country, and to the stability of its political system; hence the selection of the fittest characters to expound the law, and dispense justice, has been an invariable object of my anxious concern.

Many of the first U.S. Marshals had already proven themselves in military service during the American Revolution. Among the first marshals was John Adams' son-in-law Congressman William Stephens Smith for the district of New York. Another New York district Marshal was Congressman Thomas Morris (New York). Another early U.S. Marshal was Henry Dearborn for the district of Maine.

From the earliest days of the nation, Marshals were permitted to recruit Special Deputies as local hires or as temporary transfers to the Marshals Service from other federal law enforcement agencies. Marshals were also authorized to swear in a posse to assist them in manhunts and other duties on an ad hoc basis. Marshals were given extensive authority to support the federal courts within their judicial districts, and to carry out all lawful orders issued by federal judges, Congress, or the President.

The Marshals and their Deputies served subpoenas, summonses, writs, warrants, and other process issued by the courts, made all the arrests, and handled all federal prisoners. They also disbursed funds as ordered by the courts. Marshals paid the fees and expenses of the court clerks, U.S. Attorneys, jurors, and witnesses. They rented the courtrooms and jail space and hired the bailiffs, criers, and janitors. They made sure the prisoners were present, the jurors were available, and that the witnesses were on time.

When Washington set up his first administration and the first Congress began passing laws, both quickly discovered an inconvenient gap in the constitutional design of the government: It had no provision for a regional administrative structure stretching throughout the country. Both the Congress and the executive branch were housed at the national capital; no agency was established or designated to represent the federal government's interests at the local level. The need for a regional organization quickly became apparent. Congress and the President solved part of the problem by creating specialized agencies, such as customs and revenue collectors, to levy tariffs and taxes, yet there were numerous other jobs that needed to be done. The only officers available to do them were the Marshals and their Deputies.

Thus, the Marshals also provided local representation for the federal government within their districts. They took the national census every decade through 1870. They distributed Presidential proclamations, collected a variety of statistical information on commerce and manufacturing, supplied the names of government employees for the national register, and performed other routine tasks needed for the central government to function effectively. Over the past 200 years, Congress, the President and Governors have also have called on the Marshals to carry out unusual or extraordinary missions, such as registering enemy aliens in time of war, sealing the American border against armed expeditions from foreign countries, and at times during the Cold War, swapping spies with the Soviet Union, and also retrieving North Carolina's copy of the Bill of Rights.

Particularly in the American West, individual Deputy Marshals have been seen as legendary heroes in the face of rampant lawlessness (see Famous Marshals, below). Marshals arrested the infamous Dalton Gang in 1893, helped suppress the Pullman Strike in 1894, enforced Prohibition during the 1920s, and have protected American athletes at recent Olympic Games. Marshals protected the refugee boy Eli?n Gonz?lez before his return to Cuba in 2000, and have protected abortion clinics as required by Federal law. Since 1989, the Marshals Service has been responsible for law enforcement among U.S. personnel in Antarctica, although they are not routinely assigned there.

One of the more onerous jobs the Marshals were tasked with was the recovery of fugitive slaves, as required by the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. They were also permitted to form a posse and to deputize any person in any community to aid in the recapture of fugitive slaves. Failure to cooperate with a Marshal resulted in a $5000 fine and imprisonment, a stiff penalty for those days. The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue was a celebrated fugitive-slave case involving U.S. marshals. James Batchelder was the second marshal killed in the line of duty. Batchelder, along with others, was preventing the rescue of fugitive slave Anthony Burns in Boston in 1854.

To order by phone or for more information about this product call 1-877-543-6094
Standard delivery four to six weeks. Express delivery option available on this item.



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